overview

My research aims to understand how people answer the "big" questions in life and how people's answers to those questions influence their attitudes and behavior. Our lab formulates and tests a wide range of hypotheses related to many types of existential concerns focusing on the antecedents and consequences of the experience of meaning in life, authenticity, self-alienation, perceptions of free-will, and mortality awareness.

education and training
selected publications
Academic Articles72
Chapters7
  • Christy, A. G., Rivera, G., Chen, K., & Hicks, J. A. (2017). Existential meaning in life and positive psychological functioning. Positive Psychology: Established and Emerging Issues. (pp. 220-235). Routledge.
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  • Juhl, J., Routledge, C., Hicks, J. A., & Sedikides, C. (2017). Can Affectively Negative Experiences Contribute to Well-Being? The Affectively Negative Need-Fulfillment Model. The Happy Mind: Cognitive Contributions to Well-Being. (pp. 389-407). Springer International Publishing.
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  • Hicks, J. A., Seto, E., & Kim, J. (2015). Meaning of Life. The Encyclopedia of Adulthood and Aging. (pp. 1-5). John Wiley & Sons, Inc..
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  • Kim, J., Seto, E., Davis, W. E., & Hicks, J. A. (2014). Positive and Existential Psychological Approaches to the Experience of Meaning in Life. Meaning in Positive and Existential Psychology. (pp. 221-233). Springer New York.
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  • Wong, P. (2013). The Human Quest for Meaning. The Human Quest for Meaning: Theories, Research, and Applications. (pp. 125-142). Routledge.
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Conference Papers7
chaired theses and dissertations
Email
joshua.hicks@tamu.edu
First Name
Joshua
Last Name
Hicks
mailing address
Texas A&M University; Psychology; 4235 TAMU
College Station, TX 77843-4235
USA