Intergroup Contact, Media Exposure, and Racial Attitudes | Academic Article individual record
abstract

The present investigation uses intergroup contact and media systems' dependency theories to illuminate the relative significance of various sources of information in shaping Caucasian-American attitudes toward African-Americans. It uses empirical data from an exploratory survey of college students to build a chain of related variables that link primary sources of information (face-to-face versus mediated) to stereotypical beliefs, perceived internal causal attributions for African-Americans' failures, and prejudicial feelings toward African-Americans. Results suggest that face-to-face sources of racial/ethnic out-group information are more effective than mediated sources in prejudice reduction. The discussion includes theoretical and practical implications of the findings. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

author list (cited authors)
Ramasubramanian, S.
publication date
2013
publisher
altmetric score

18.0

citation count

16

identifier
49724SE
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)
start page
54
end page
72
volume
42
issue
1