Dispersal of female and male Aedes aegypti from discarded container habitats using a stable isotope mark-capture study design in South Texas. | Academic Article individual record
abstract

Aedes aegypti is the main vector of arboviral diseases such as dengue, chikungunya and Zika. A key feature for disease transmission modeling and vector control planning is adult mosquito dispersal. We studied Ae aegypti adult dispersal by conducting a mark-capture study of naturally occurring Ae. aegypti from discarded containers found along a canal that divided two residential communities in Donna, Texas, USA. Stable isotopes were used to enrich containers with either 13C or 15N. Adult mosquitoes were collected outdoors in the yards of households throughout the communities with BG Sentinel 2 traps during a 12-week period. Marked mosquito pools with stable isotopes were used to estimate the mean distance travelled using three different approaches (Net, Strip or Circular) and the probability of detecting an isotopically marked adult at different distances from the larval habitat of origin. We consistently observed, using the three approaches that male (Net: 220 m, Strip: 255 m, Circular: 250 m) Ae. aegypti dispersed further in comparison to gravid (Net: 135 m, Strip: 176 m, Circular: 189 m) and unfed females (Net: 192 m, Strip: 213 m, Circular: 198 m). We also observed that marked male capture probability slightly increased with distance, while, for both unfed and gravid females, such probability decreased with distance. Using a unique study design documenting adult dispersal from natural larval habitat, our results suggest that Ae. aegypti adults disperse longer distances than previously reported. These results may help guide local vector control authorities in their fight against Ae. aegypti and the diseases it transmits, suggesting coverage of 200 m for the use of insecticides and innovative vector control tools.

author list (cited authors)
Juarez, J. G., Garcia-Luna, S., Chaves, L. F., Carbajal, E., Valdez, E., Avila, C., ... Hamer, G. L.
publication date
2020
published in