NEUROLEPTIC-INDUCED CATALEPSY - A D2 BLOCKADE PHENOMENON | Academic Article individual record
abstract

Typical neuroleptics, such as haloperidol, are cataleptogenic. But since such drugs block both D1 and D2 receptors, it is not clear if there is a differential receptor role in catalepsy. To test this issue in a mouse model of catalepsy, these experiments tested molindone, a D2-blocking neuroleptic with almost no ability to block D1 receptors. If D1 receptor blockade is necessary for catalepsy, molindone should not cause catalepsy. But molindone was cataleptogenic, albeit less potent than haloperidol. There was also a \"training effect\" with haloperidol, but not saline or molindone, in that the catalepsy produced by 5 mg/kg of haloperidol was much greater when tests were performed repeatedly at short intervals after injection. Concurrent administration of apomorphine (4 or 8 mg/kg) markedly potentiated haloperidol catalepsy, but had no effect on molindone catalepsy. Such results are not readily interpretable solely in terms of current concepts of D1 and D2 receptors.

author list (cited authors)
KLEMM, W. R.
publication date
1985
publisher
Elsevier bv Publisher
published in
keywords
  • Mice
  • Haloperidol
  • Catalepsy
  • Time Factors
  • Male
  • Receptors, Dopamine D2
  • Molindone
  • Drug Interactions
  • Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
  • Receptors, Dopamine
  • Antipsychotic Agents
  • Animals
  • Apomorphine
citation count

24