MODULATION OF FREQUENCY OF HIPPOCAMPAL RHYTHMIC, SLOW ACTIVITY (THETA) BY STIMULATION OF OTHER BRAIN AREAS | Academic Article individual record
abstract

The rhythmic, slow electrical activity (RSA) of the hippocampus has been correlated with many diverse processes and behaviors, yet its significance is not understood. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that naturally occurring changes in frequency of RSA reflect specific neural information processing reactions, as opposed to secondary changes along an arousal continuum. The test strategy was to: (1) evoke RSA by electrical stimulation of the brain stem reticular formation (BSRF), and (2) monitor RSA frequency during simultaneous stimulation of other brain areas (usually caudate, parietal neocortex, piriform cortex, amygdala, and contralateral hippocampus. Control stimulation of every test site at 10/sec usually evoked at 10/sec RSA. When the BSRF was stimulated simultaneously, the RSA it normally evoked was replaced with 10/sec RSA, except in 7 of 26 tests wherein stimulation of piriform cortex or amygdala modulated RSA frequency so that it differed from 10/sec as well as the RSA frequency that was evoked from BSRF. Control high-frequency stimulation of test sites generally had no effect on hippocampus, but concurrent stimulation of every test site could modulate the frequency of BSRF-evoked RSA. Some of the concurrent stimulations caused RSA frequency shifts in a direction opposite to that which would have been predicted by the arousal-continuum theory. © 1974.

author list (cited authors)
KLEMM, W. R., & DOUGLASS, J. H.
publication date
1974
publisher
Elsevier bv Publisher
published in
keywords
  • Electric Stimulation
  • Conditioning, Operant
  • Brain
  • Caudate Nucleus
  • Rats
  • Reticular Formation
  • Arousal
  • Amygdala
  • Electroencephalography
  • Animals
  • Cerebral Cortex
  • Motor Activity
  • Orientation
  • Hippocampus
  • Neural Pathways
citation count

11