Coaching self-efficacy, desire to become a head coach, and occupational turnover intent: Gender differences between NCAA assistant coaches of women's teams | Academic Article individual record
abstract

The proportion of women serving as head coaches of women's teams in the NCAA has steadily decreased from 90% in 1972 to 45.6% in 2000 (Acosta & Carpenter, 2000). To investigate this trend, aspects of Bandura's (1977, 1986) social cognitive theory was utilized to examine the relationship between coaching self-efficacy, desire to become a head coach, and occupational turnover intentions among assistant coaches of women's teams. Results indicated the male assistant coaches possessed greater coaching self-efficacy and desire to become a head coach while females had greater occupational turnover intentions. Further, regression analyses indicated that coaching self-efficacy predicted desire to become a head coach among both men and women but was only related to turnover for male assistant coaches. These results provide additional understanding as to why women constitute a smaller percentage of the coaches of women's teams.

publication outlet

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORT PSYCHOLOGY

author list (cited authors)
Cunningham, G. B., Sagas, M., & Ashley, F. B.
publication date
2003
keywords
  • Coaching Self-efficacy
  • Head Coaching
  • Turnover
identifier
175342SE
start page
125
end page
137
volume
34
issue
2