A deficiency or excess of dietary threonine reduces protein synthesis in jejunum and skeletal muscle of young pigs | Academic Article individual record
abstract

Dietary threonine imbalance is known to reduce the growth of the small intestine, liver, and skeletal muscle in young animals, but the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. Using the pig model, this study was conducted to test the hypothesis that either a deficiency or an excess of dietary threonine impairs protein synthesis in these tissues. Young pigs (25 d of age) were fed diets containing 0.37, 0.74 (current NRC requirement) or 1.11% true ileal digestible threonine (TIDT) (n = 6/diet). Pigs receiving the 0.74 and 1.11% TIDT diets were pair-fed with the same amount of feed as pigs receiving the 0.37% TIDT diet. After a 14-d dietary treatment, the fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of protein in tissues was measured using a flooding dose of l-phenylalanine plus L-[ring-(2)H(5)]phenylalanine. The results indicated that the FSR of protein in liver was reduced (P < 0.05) in pigs fed the 0.37% TIDT diet compared with pigs fed the 0.74 or 1.11% TIDT diet, and did not differ between pigs fed the 0.74 and 1.11% TIDT diets. The FSR of protein in longissimus muscle, jejunal mucosa, and mucins was reduced (P < 0.05) in pigs fed the 0.37 or 1.11% TIDT diet compared with pigs fed the 0.74% TIDT diet. The absolute synthesis rate of protein in the jejunal mucosa and muscle was also reduced (P < 0.01) in pigs fed the 0.37 and 1.11% TIDT diets compared with the controls. The absolute synthesis rate of hepatic protein was lower (P < 0.01) in pigs fed the 0.37% TIDT diets when compared with pigs fed the 0.74% TIDT diet. Protein synthesis in skeletal muscle as well as jejunal mucosa and mucins was reduced to a greater extent than that in liver in response to an imbalance of dietary threonine. Collectively, these results indicate that either an excess or a deficiency of dietary threonine decreases protein synthesis in rapidly growing tissues of young pigs. The findings provide a mechanism for the low growth performance of animals fed a threonine-imbalanced diet.

authors
author list (cited authors)
Wang, X. u., Qiao, S., Yin, Y., Yue, L., Wang, Z., & Wu, G.
publication date
2007
published in
keywords
  • Animals
  • Jejunum
  • Muscle, Skeletal
  • Threonine
  • Male
  • Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
  • Liver
  • Glycine
  • Diet
  • Swine
  • Protein Biosynthesis