Using Southern Oscillation Information for Determining Corn and Sorghum Profit-Maximizing Input Levels in East-Central Texas | Academic Article individual record
abstract

Research into Southern Oscillation (SO) phenomena and related sea surface temperature is providing promising results concerning the ability to improve long-range climate forecasts. This study asks whether SO event information would be of value to Texas corn (Zea mays L.) and sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] producers. Simple ordinary least squares regressions suggest that an El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) event increases preseason rainfall by approximately 3 in., whereas, a cold SO event decreases rainfall by 4 in. These extreme phases appeared to have no impact on growing season precipitation. Economic results indicate that SO information is more valuable for corn than sorghum producers. The value of SO information ranged from $1 to $2/acre for corn production, depending on price. For sorghum, use of SO information had no value.

publication outlet

Journal of Production Agriculture

author list (cited authors)
Mjelde, J. W., Thompson, T. N., Hons, F. M., Cothren, J. T., & Coffman, C. G.
publication date
1997
publisher
altmetric score

3.0

citation count

20

identifier
142859SE
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)
start page
168
end page
175
volume
10
issue
1