Unique features of a global human ectoparasite identified through sequencing of the bed bug genome | Academic Article individual record
abstract

The bed bug, Cimex lectularius, has re-established itself as a ubiquitous human ectoparasite throughout much of the world during the past two decades. This global resurgence is likely linked to increased international travel and commerce in addition to widespread insecticide resistance. Analyses of the C. lectularius sequenced genome (650 Mb) and 14,220 predicted protein-coding genes provide a comprehensive representation of genes that are linked to traumatic insemination, a reduced chemosensory repertoire of genes related to obligate hematophagy, host-symbiont interactions, and several mechanisms of insecticide resistance. In addition, we document the presence of multiple putative lateral gene transfer events. Genome sequencing and annotation establish a solid foundation for future research on mechanisms of insecticide resistance, human-bed bug and symbiont-bed bug associations, and unique features of bed bug biology that contribute to the unprecedented success of C. lectularius as a human ectoparasite.

author list (cited authors)
Benoit, J. B., Adelman, Z. N., Reinhardt, K., Dolan, A., Poelchau, M., Jennings, E. C., ... Richards, S.
publication date
2016
published in
keywords
  • Bedbugs
  • Insecticides
  • Sequence Analysis, DNA
  • Ectoparasitic Infestations
  • Feeding Behavior
  • Insecticide Resistance
  • Genome
  • Gene Transfer, Horizontal
  • Animals
  • Host-Parasite Interactions
  • Humans
altmetric score

491.124

citation count

90